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Daily Affirmation Daily Affirmation:
I will do my best today, because I want to do it, not because I have to do it and not because I am trying to please others.

   

Tag Archives: bliss

Meditation: Self Nurture

To grow the best fruit, the farmer does not water each piece individually as it hangs from the tree. Instead, great care is taken to ensure that the roots of the tree are watered sufficiently in order for the tree to reach its full potential. The product of that full potential is delicious fruit which everyone can enjoy.

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Ignorance and Realization

Whether through accumulated stress or the mechanism of social conditioning, we may have become habituated to the practice of ignoring subtle changes.

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Meditation: The Problem with Transcendence

Everyone who learns Vedic or Transcendental Meditation loves the experience of transcendence (where no more thoughts are entered into the head and you are just sitting in pure silence, contentment, and bliss without reacting to internal or external influencers). It’s new, it’s different, and actually quite unique. It seems like the more we meditate, the more transcendence we should experience.

But there is a problem with transcendence.

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Meditation: No Dark Side

Whenever asked about his own level of consciousness, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi would reply, “We’re doing just fine, thanks.”   

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Meditation: Identity Crisis

To grow the best fruit, the farmer does not water each individual mango as it hangs from the tree.  Instead, great care is taken to ensure that the roots of the tree are watered sufficiently in order for the tree to reach its full potential.  The product of that full potential is delicious fruit which everyone can enjoy.  The farmer knows where the source is, and how to nurture it.

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Our Full Potential

 The more optimistic psychologists and neuroscientists agree that most of us use about 10% of our full mental potential. The pessimistic ones say that number is closer to 2% – but whatever the figure is, it’s certainly small. That leaves 90% or more of our mental capacity spent recycling, rehearsing, regretting or simply dormant.

The Vedic model of the mind states that we are only aware of the surface levels of mental activity. Mental stresses maintain background neural activity at a high level, preventing awareness of the quieter underlying levels of thinking. It’s not unlike speeding down the freeway in a car with the windows rolled down – the noise of the air and engine necessitate our turning the radio up, yet still we hear only the general outline of the music.

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The Unconcern of Meditation

Sitting quietly in meditation is a practice which reveals our least excited state – the very basis of our Being.  However, our least excited state may not always result in an experience of sustained pure silence.  Instead, we must think of our least excited state as our simplest form of awareness in that particular moment

As the mind dives into meditation, our body faithfully and dutifully prints out whatever state of de-excitation the mind is able to achieve.  The sequence is:  first the mind, and then the body.  These are the mechanics of how the body launders stress – through simple rest – and the engine driving that process is the mind. 

As the body unwinds stress, the mind can become active with thoughts, emotions or even body sensation.  Those experiences are the after effect of the body unstressing.  Whenever we have those experiences in our meditation, as long they are preceded by our thinking the mantra, then we know they are the byproduct of stress release.  Something good is happening.

When there is more stress in the body, there are more opportunities for stress to be released.  During the early days of meditation, when the body is still holding a lifetime backlog of stress, only very little de-excitation is needed in order to trigger its release.  As we clear out that backlog through regular practice, the trend is toward more sustained periods of depth in meditation.

However, deeper meditation is not solely a function of how many months or years we have been practicing.  We must also factor in whatever is happening in our current life experience.  Life is change, and with change comes a variety of demands.  Sometimes those demands can overwhelm us and add stress.  Even though experienced meditators find this happening less and less in their lives, no one is completely immune – no matter how much meditation we’ve done.

For most, the three biggest demands in life are change in living situation, change in work (financial) situation and change in relationship status.  Even long time meditators report that their depth of meditation can change when those demands arise.  Oftentimes, meditation during those challenging periods feels more “on the surface” and less relaxing, and some even feel a little agitated coming out of their practice.

If any of those experiences sounds familiar, know that you are not alone.  And also, remind yourself that it is just a small bump in the road – it will pass.  Ultimately, the perfect prescription is simply to keep regular with our practice, and take the whole experience as it comes, without judgement or concern. 

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Meditation and Understanding Fulfillment

Transcendence in our meditation is an experience of bliss. Bliss in its pure state it is far beyond interpretation by the senses. All the senses go silent. In this state of pure contentment, all cognitive processes come to an end.

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