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Got Gluten Sensitivities? Move Past “All Purpose Flour”

whole grain breadGot gluten sensitivities? Why don’t you try something more than the traditional and overused “All Purpose” flour, which prove not the most purposeful for our different bodies. It’s exciting that words like “whole grain”, “gluten-free”, “whole wheat” and “spouted grain” flours are becoming less and less foreign to the average consumer. Here are a few white flour alternatives that are perfect if you or someone you know have gluten sensitivities (or if you are looking to add more whole grains into your daily diet). 

almonds1. Almond flour is grain free, very versatile, and contains a great amount of protein, healthy fats, and thirty five percent of the average person’s RDA for vitamin E! Note that almond flour needs to be refrigerates to prevent spoilage. Almond flour is best used for chicken or fish, crab cakes, or an alternative for bread crumbs. It is also a great thickener for soup.

Almond flour nutrition facts include; (Per ¼ cup) 160 calories, 14g of fat(1 sat), 6g carbs (1g sugar), 0 sodium, 3g fiber and 6g  of protein.

quinoa2. Quinoa flour is full of beneficial nutrients, fiber and is a complete protein. This type of flour, may be a little bitter so some, so to get rid of that taste you can grind the flour and bake the quinoa flour on parchment paper in the oven for about ten minutes at 215 degrees. Quinoa flour is best used to make cookies and cakes healthier.

Quinoa flour nutrition facts include; (Per ¼ cup) 110 calories, 1.5g fat (0g sat), 18g carbs(0g sugar), 8mg sodium, 2g fiber and 4g of protein.

soy lecithin powder3. If you are not allergic to soy products, Soy flour (non-GMO and organic) is a great alternative to white flour. Soy flour is made of ground soy beans that are packed with calcium and fiber. Soy flour also has three times the protein of white flour. Soy flour is best used for making sauces thicker and used for non-yeasted recipes.

Soy flour nutrition facts include; (Per ¼ cup) 120 calories, 6g fat(1g sat), 8g carbs(2g sugar), 0mg sodium, 3g of fiber, and 10g of protein.

barley4. Barley flour is very high in fiber and can help lower blood, cholesterol and sugar levels. Though barley flour does contain gluten, it is an alternative to the ‘all purpose flour’ and best used for making biscuits, pancakes and breads fluffier.

Barley flour nutrition facts include; (Per ¼ cup) 110 calories, 0g fat, 23g carbs(0g sugar), 3mg sodium, 5g fiber, and 5g of protein.

 

spelt5. Spelt flour has a slight sweetness and nutty taste to it. Spelt flour also contains gluten, but bakes up lighter and softer and it is full of fiber. Again, this is an alternative to white flour and is best used for baked goods, and breads.

Spelt flour nutrition facts include; (Per ¼ cup), 120 calories, 1g fat(0g sat), 22g carbs(0g sugar), 1mg sodium, 4g fiber, and 4g of protein.

6. Sprouted Chick Pea, Lentil, Amaranth Flour grains2

This is a great company (www.organicsproutedflour.net) that educates and sells sprouted flour. These are bullet point reasons why sprouted flour is flat out much better than the traditional, processed and striped-of-anything-nutritious white flour.

  • “Easier to Digest – Sprouting breaks down a portion of the starches in grains into simple sugars so your body can digest them more like a vegetable (like a tomato, not a potato).
  • Increased Vitamin C – Sprouting produces vitamin C.
  • Increased Vitamin B – Sprouting increases the vitamin B content (B2, B5, and B6).
  • Increased Carotene – Sprouting increases the carotene up to eight times.
  • Increased Enzymes are actually produced during sprouting.
  • Reduction of Anti-nutrients – Sprouting neutralizes enzyme inhibitors and phytic acid, which is a substance present in the bran of all grains that inhibits absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc.”

Additional flours that are gluten free include: Teff, Buckwheat and Coconut.

Sources: Women’s health magazine, September 2013, www.organicsproutedflour.net/www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

2 Responses so far.

  1. Sabrina says:

    Wow thanks for this article!! Got it from my friend Angela. It’s been tough switching to gluten free meals. Definitely going to experience with these alternative flours!

  2. Christa says:

    I appreciate the idea behind this post, but be careful when giving out this kind of information. Barley flour and spelt flour DO contain gluten. Try millet, teff, amaranth, or buckwheat for flours that are actually gluten free.

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